Friday, April 19 2024

Hailing from Germany, the progressive alternative rock band Porter fuse a unique blend of metal, punk, indie, singer-songwriter, hardcore, and alternative influences. The band’s distinctive sound, rooted in the energetic guitar-driven alternative rock of the ’90s, incorporates progressive elements and rich production, offering a fresh take on the genre. Notably, their music carries a powerful lyrical statement against totalitarianism and fascism, acting as a beacon for democracy and freedom.

Behind The Banlieue,’ the second single from their upcoming album ‘Genosha,’ exemplifies Porter’s thematic focus on a society growing increasingly divergent. Following the progressive tone of the first single, this track takes a more straightforward rock approach.

The song kicks off with mid-tempo guitars and drums, reminiscent of bands like Queensryche and Mastodon. But, just before you get too comfortable, the instrumentation cleverly incorporates a swift time change to add interest before the verse begins. The vocals enter with a warm thickness, echoing vibes of vocalists like Fish, Peter Gabriel, and Dave Gilmour. The well-phrased melody and interplay with the guitars add depth to the storytelling.

The chorus intensifies the power while maintaining clarity in the vocals and lyrics, which is needed for a track with a story to tell. The thematic elements of exile, resistance, and societal struggles are conveyed poignantly:

Long forgotten sons and daughters,

Marched the longest time to the slaughter .

This pure life’s lucidity,

Has to be valid for you and me.

Behind The Banlieue

A clever melodic drop and chord change end each chorus, an almost discomforting nuance that ensures the listener stays engaged. By the time the second chorus hits, I feel like I’ve known this song forever – like an old friend.

A standout moment occurs after the second chorus, where an augmented passage echoes the classic ‘Only Women Bleed’ by Alice Cooper. Whether subconscious or a clever intention to use a track that is also about oppression and the scars left by abuse… it works amazingly well! Porter amplifies the intensity here with an eerie voiceover, creating a suspenseful build-up that, true to Porter’s style, leads to an unexpected drop instead of the predictable crescendo. The track then concludes with a return to the chorus and provides a satisfying but dark close.

‘Behind The Banlieue’ is a well-produced and solid follow-up to the previous single, ‘Tax Free Hollows,’ (Review Here >) and as Porter gear up for their much-anticipated album ‘Genosha,’ set to be released in early 2024, the band promises a metal-heavy focus, marking a new chapter in their musical journey. The professionalism evident in both the song and accompanying video sets high expectations for the upcoming album, leaving listeners eagerly awaiting what Porter has in store.

In summary, ‘Behind The Banlieue’ showcases Porter’s ability to craft a brilliant and dynamic track, leaving listeners eagerly anticipating the larger narrative promised by the forthcoming album ‘Genosha.’ And, I cannot wait!

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Review

Summary

Porter’s latest single, ‘Behind The Banlieue,’ exhibits their diverse sound with mid-tempo guitars and a warm vocal delivery, addressing societal themes. The track builds anticipation for their upcoming metal-heavy album, ‘Genosha,’ set to release in early 2024.
91%
Insightfully Evocative

Rating

Song Quality
Vocal Performance
Lyrics
Instrumentation
Production

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About Author

Matt Warren

Matt Warren is a Cheshire based musician who studied contemporary music and composition. When not writing for The Indie Grid he enjoys watching 'Breaking Bad' on continuous loop and going to gigs. Since a youngster his fave band have been 'The Beatles' (with 'Cardiacs' in at a close second)... and this still applies to this day.

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