Sunday, April 21 2024

Stockholm-based Elviise have just released their latest single, ‘Skin and Bones,’ showcasing a remarkable demonstration of the band’s evolution and musical skill. Having previously reviewed their exceptional single, ‘I Will Carry You,’ I eagerly awaited their next musical offering. While I thought ‘I Will Carry You’ was good, now, having listened to ‘Skin and Bones,’ I’m struck not only by the evident talent but also by the immense potential of this Swedish rock outfit. I’m genuinely asking myself why this band is not gracing large stages across Europe, nay, the world!

From the opening notes, the new single presents a refined and mature sound. I still sense undertones of Ghost with their pop/rock and anthem sensibilities. But, what Elviise do exceptionally well is craft commercial-sounding rock that remains accessible to those who prefer the underground metal scene. They cover all the bases.

Elviise Swedish Metal Band

Musically, the guitar riffs, bearing hints of Metallica in their bouncy chugging style and Dave Mustaine-esque time changes, have a thick, unmistakable sound that immediately grabs your attention. Supported by a rhythm section that’s both relentless and precise, the drums hit hard and clean, while the bass sits tight… exactly where it needs to be. This instrumental arrangement lays a solid foundation upon which the song unfolds with conviction and power.

However, it’s the vocal performance that truly shines on ‘Skin and Bones.’ With a voice that possesses a range and emotive depth similar to the sweet end of Taylor Momsen but also hard-hitting when required, like Sharon den Adel or even Melissa Bonny, it’s precise! Whether moving through smooth, melodic verses or belting out the anthemic chorus, the vocals command attention, making each lyric feel genuine and sincere.

Elviise Stockholm Band

The other thing that struck me about ‘Skin and Bones’ is its dynamic range. Elviise expertly navigate between moments of quiet introspection and bursts of explosive energy, ensuring the listener stays hooked throughout. The stripped-down interlude around the 1:30 mark, where the song transitions to clean guitar and vocals, provides a brief respite before kicking back in with the catchy chorus section. Additionally, a clever time change a minute later adds further interest to the track. These surprises, packed into a concise 3-and-a-half-minute song, truly highlight Elviise’s standout qualities to me.

Lyrically, ‘Skin and Bones’ delves into themes of self-reflection and existentialism, asking the listener to reconsider their priorities in a world consumed by materialism. The song’s origins, stemming from a spontaneous jam session, are as authentic as the message the band wish to portray.

In conclusion, ‘Skin and Bones’ stands as a testament to Elviise’s songwriting, talent and potential as musicians. With their next album on the horizon later in 2024, it’s clear that they are poised for even greater success. If you’re a fan of rock music that is both powerful and introspective, do yourself a favor and give Elviise a listen. Trust me, you won’t be disappointed.

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Review

Summary

Elviise’s latest single, ‘Skin and Bones,’ impressively showcases the band’s evolution and musical skill, leaving listeners captivated with its refined sound and dynamic range. From the powerful vocal performance to the masterful instrumental arrangement, this track promises an exciting future for the Swedish rock outfit.
90%
Powerful & Captivating

Rating

Song Quality
Vocal Performance
Lyrics
Instrumentation
Production

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About Author

Matt Warren

Matt Warren is a Cheshire based musician who studied contemporary music and composition. When not writing for The Indie Grid he enjoys watching 'Breaking Bad' on continuous loop and going to gigs. Since a youngster his fave band have been 'The Beatles' (with 'Cardiacs' in at a close second)... and this still applies to this day.

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